• OUR MISSION

    Improve the health of the people of Wisconsin by supporting and strengthening physicians' ability to practice high-quality patient care in a changing environment.

Advocacy

The Wisconsin Medical Society is the only organization that represents all physicians in Wisconsin regardless of specialty or practice size.

We present a strong, unified physician voice at the Capitol and in the courtroom to safeguard the patient-physician relationship; to ensure that patients have access to high-quality, cost-efficient care; and to preserve Wisconsin as one of the best states for physicians to practice medicine.

We make sure the physician voice is heard on the wide range of issues that affect today’s changing health care landscape. Click on the links below to learn more, or use the navigation links to find out how you can get involved.

At the Capitol

The Society reviews hundreds of bills and proposed regulations every biennium to ensure that elected officials and government bureaucrats are acting in the best interests of the state’s physicians and patients, and therefore the entire health care system. Working from the Society’s Policy Compendium and with the Society’s policy-deliberating entities like the Board of Directors, Policy Panel, and Council on Legislation, Society lobbyists and policy staff advocate based on sound policy and regardless of partisan ideology.

Because it advocates for physicians as individuals, the Society does not limit its advocacy to business or other economic interests. The spectrum of issues runs the gamut each biennium in proposals that can impact the patient-physician relationship. The Society stands up for patients by advocating for advancements in public health and better health care access for our most vulnerable citizens. The Society also fiercely supports allowing physicians to take care of those patients in a state that has a positive environment for practicing medicine. Issues such as Wisconsin’s medical lawsuit environment and third party interference with the physician-patient relationship—whether that interference comes from insurance companies, electronic health records requirements or government mandates—can adversely impact the potential for physician dissatisfaction.

The Society also strives to maintain positive relationships with regulatory entities like the state’s Medical Examining Board, the Controlled Substance’s Board, the Medicaid program and many others to ensure that all proposals keep in mind the potential impact on physicians and their ability to take care of patients.

Now more than ever physicians need (and deserve) vigilance from those who are “on their side”—not just as a professional providing care but as a human being coping with the stresses of being a physician in the 21st century.

To learn more about the Society’s efforts at the State Capitol, contact Peter Welch.