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Interstate Medical Licensure Compact update garners strong Society support

A bill to ensure that Wisconsin can remain in the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC) received strong support from the Society and others at a legislative committee hearing earlier today at the State Capitol. 2019 Senate Bill 74, authored by State Sen. Patrick Testin and State Assembly Rep. Nancy VanderMeer, will allow Wisconsin to stay in the IMLC by removing a “sunset” clause inserted into the state statutes as a failsafe when Wisconsin first joined the IMLC in 2015.

The bill, which enjoys broad bipartisan support, received a public hearing before the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services. Society lobbyist Mark Grapentine, JD, appeared in support of the bill, and Society President Molli Rolli, MD, issued this statement of support for SB 74 following the hearing. Similar legislation has been introduced in the State Assembly as Assembly Bill 70 and is currently awaiting a public hearing in the Assembly Committee on Health.

The IMLC allows physicians to apply for faster licensure in states participating in the IMLC by eliminating the need to resubmit the same basic information in each individual state application. Physicians using the Compact path for licensure choose a State of Primary Licensure (SPL)—that state verifies the authenticity of the submitted information, which is often the most time-consuming part of a license application. Other compact states then accept SPL-verified information in an application as valid and do not have to re-authenticate the same information.

Wisconsin joined the IMLC when 2015 Assembly Bill 253 was signed into law on December 14, 2015. That Act’s “sunset” clause would have automatically removed the state from the compact in December 2019; it was included to ensure Wisconsin could easily exit the IMLC if it proved ineffective. Fortunately, the IMLC has enjoyed good success in Wisconsin, with hundreds of physicians using the voluntary process to obtain their Wisconsin medical licenses.

Contact Mark Grapentine, JD, in the Society’s Government Relations department for more information.

Back to March 14, 2019 Medigram